Camera Motors

Camera Motors tell the Camera Controller where and how to look at the world. There are a bunch of different types of motors.

Fixed Camera Motor

This is the simplest type of Camera Motor. It stays at a fixed position, just like a surveillance security camera and it can rotate to look at different types of targets.

(Fixed cameras rotate towards their target)
  • Default: Doesn't rotate

  • Player: Looks at the player

  • Target: Looks at a specific target

  • Position: Looks at a specific world-space position

Follow Camera Motor

The Follow Camera Motor is similar to the Fixed Motor as it allows to look at a specific target/position/player but it also allows to follow it.

(Follow Cameras keep a constant distance from their anchor target)

This type of camera is usually used for RTS or Top-Down games.

Add a little dampening to the Camera Controller to avoid jittering.

Target Camera Motor

The Target Camera behaves much similar like the Follow Camera but also accepts a Look At target. It's mostly used for Shoulder cameras where the camera is anchored to a position (Player's shoulder) but the focus of the camera is targeting another scene object.

(Camera orbits around the anchor while keeping both the anchor and target inside the screen)

This camera can also be used to highlight a place of interest

Railway Camera Motor

The Railway Camera Motor is a little bit more sophisticated type of motor. It allows the camera to follow the target along a path (or rail) but never exceed it.

(Railway cameras also have scene gizmos)

Railway Cameras are a bit difficult to understand at first but are a powerful tool to create cinematic experiences.

(See how the camera follows the blue ball when it's inside its constrained bounds)

The player (blue ball) moves from right to left. When the player is within the plane of the blue line, the camera linearly interpolates the player's position with its min-max path.

In other words, the camera follows the Player as long as the Player is within the blue line. Otherwise it stays at the edge of the path.

This type of cameras are very useful for corridors or narrow rooms.

You can modify the camera path and the player min-max path by clicking and dragging the white balls in the scene view.

Tween Camera Motor

The Tween Camera Motor allows to move the camera from a position A to position B within a time window. It is mostly used for cutscenes or small animations.

(Move the camera from A to B within a time window)

Tween Camera Motors are easily set up using the scene view gizmos. The motor's position corresponds to the initial position while the white dot is the end position

First Person Camera Motor

The First Person Motor allows to create FPS action games like Call of Duty or horror games like The Elder Scrolls.

(Max pitch avoids overshooting rotations)

This camera motor allows to define the mouse sensitivity, the amount of dampening/spring the camera moves relative to the mouse and the maximum pitch rotation (in case you want to limit the visual spectrum of the player).

Adventure Camera Motor

The Adventure Camera is an advanced camera system that behaves like the cameras from Tomb Raider or Uncharted series.

(Adventure Camera Motor has a quite a few configuration parameters)

The camera orbits around a target using the mouse movement (on Desktop) or using the touch-screen if the target device is mobile.

You can also toggle whether you want to avoid wall collision.